About Us

We’re a highly collaborative and supportive team, who’s main goal is to maintain the health of Silver Lake

The Team

Officers

Directors

Nancy Devine, Paul Littlefield, Joanna Lucy, Doug McAllister 

What We Do

Water Monitoring

This program was designed to quickly identify water quality changes and problems through regular sampling and testing

Samples and values are collected at six stations strategically located around Silver Lake each week during the warmer months. Additionally, a team from the fresh water biology group at the University of New Hampshire visits Silver Lake annually for more extensive testing.

 

Data concerning water temperature, water clarity, lake stratification, chlorophyll content, phosphorus level and acidity (ph) are collected and analyzed. This data forms the basis of an extensive annual report and comparative evaluation.

 

The sampling is done by a group of volunteers (often a husband and wife team). Each team devotes approximately three hours per year to the effort.

 

If you would like to join this group, please fill out our volunteer form.

Six water samples are tested for pH, alkalinity and chlorophyll.   The process takes 1.5 to 3 hours, depending on how efficient you are.  There are two tubs of equipment associated with the three tests.  It helps to have space to activate the “lab” of equipment in a controlled environment for a testing session’s period of time and room to store it after.  The ability to freeze small sample bottles is required as well.

 

If you would like to join this group, please fill out our volunteer form.

Aquatic Invasive Species (AIS) Prevention

This program was developed to prevent the introduction and spread of exotic aquatic species (such as variable milfoil) in New Hampshire’s lakes and ponds.  This program consists of two subprograms, Weed Watching and Lake Host

Weed Watching

Weed watchers monitor for aquatic species along the shoreline of Silver Lake. Volunteers are trained to identify both native and non-native aquatic plants. The goal of the project is to watch for invasive weeds that have the potential to spread and cause damage. Detecting these weeds early allows us to stop them before they get too entrenched to remove.

 

Volunteers are assigned designated shoreline segments to monitor Silver Lake’s perimeter using their own canoes, kayaks or other slow-moving boats.

 

If you find a possible invasive plant growing in Silver Lake please follow the SLAM Aquatic Invasive Species (AIS) protocol as defined in the document link below.

 

If you would like to join this group, please fill out our volunteer form.

Goal

To prevent the introduction and spread of exotic aquatic species (such as variable milfoil) in Silver Lake.

Background

The Lake Host Program at Silver Lake has been extremely successful in educating and inspecting boaters.  It has also prevented milfoil from entering the lake on at least five different occasions to date. Between educating and preventing, SLAM is indebted to this excellent program provided by the New Hampshire Lakes Association. 

 

If you would like to join this group, please fill out our volunteer form.

Advocacy

Now more than ever, Silver Lake needs a voice in Concord with our state legislators letting them know that we want them to support common-sense laws and regulations that protect New Hampshire’s nearly 1,000 lakes and ponds. In coordination with the NH Lakes organization, SLAM and other lake conservation non-profits are committed to providing that voice by engaging their members in advocacy. Through our e-mail news alerts, SLAM educates members on prospective legislation under consideration and tells them how they can communicate their opinions to our state legislators.

 

To keep informed of this program please subscribe to our newsletter.

Why We Love Silver Lake

Much of the lake’s perimeter is forested, but there are numerous swimming spots. Popular beaches include “South Beach”, “Nichols Beach”, and “Monument Beach.” It was the summer home of e. e. cummings whose father had built two houses on the lake’s eastern shore and later purchased the nearby Joy Farm where Cummings’ spent most of his summers as well as his final days.  The monument at Monument Beach is in memory of his farther, Rev. Edward Cummings.

Swimming

Wooded Perimiter

Pristine Water Quality

Town Maintained Beaches